SCRCA Project: Glossary of terms and code-list

This combined glossary of terms and code-list has been designed primarily for use by the volunteers assisting with the SCRCA Project. The information has been made publicly available as it may be helpful / interesting to anyone viewing the online SCRCA database.


Accessibility (ease of access)

How easy or difficult is it to reach the structure or site?

Easy: The structure or site is within half a mile of a public road and / or open (i.e. operational) railway station. Where some walking is required, the route is easy to discern (even in bad weather) and the terrain is relatively flat / even. The assessment can be carried-out by an able-bodied person of average fitness wearing stout footwear and normal clothing. If you can reach the nearest access point (public road  / open railway station), no special equipment or skills are required to reach the structure / site (or a good publicly accessible vantage point from which to view the structure / site).

Moderate: The structure or site is between half a mile and two miles from a road and / or the route crosses uneven terrain and / or access involves a moderate ascent / descent. The assessment can be carried-out by any fit, able-bodied person who has the ability to navigate to / from the structure / site and who is wearing footwear designed specifically for country-walking. In addition to being able to reach the nearest access point (public road  / open railway station), a map & compass are required. Waterproof clothing and food & drink are also strongly recommended.

Difficult: The structure or site is more than two miles from a road and / or the terrain is extremely rough and / or access involves a significant ascent / descent. NB: a visit to some of the more remote locations covered by this project will involve a walk of up to twelve miles across rough paths and boggy moorland with up to 450m of assent / descent. In a few cases there are no clearly defined paths for several miles of the route. Assessments categorised as 'difficult' should only be carried-out by an experienced and fully equipped fell-walker who is thoroughly familiar with the area. For added safety, a similarly equipped and experienced companion is strongly recommended.

No Access: There is no public access to the structure or site, or to a vantage point from where it can be seen with a worthwhile degree of clarity.

Unknown: The accessibility of the structure or site has not yet been assessed.

Notes on 'accessibility':

Some of the photographs contained on this website were provided by Network Rail personnel and the owners of other private property. Others were obtained by authorised SCRCA Team Members after permission to access private property had been requested and granted. This means that you will not be able to legally view or photograph some of the structures featured in the SCRCA database without obtaining similar assistance or permissions. That said, many of the structures / sites can be viewed from Public Rights of Way or other designated publicly accessible areas (e.g. C.R.O.W. land). The 'accessibility' definitions listed above all assume that the visitor / assessor is able and willing to travel to / from the nearest access point by train, bus, car, etc.

If you would like to view one or more of the SCRCA structures in the real world, you are strongly advised to assess the accessibility of the structure for yourself in advance using a suitable map (e.g. the appropriate Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 sheet). Do NOT rely on the 'accessibility' classifications, grid-references or other location information stored in this database as it may be inaccurate or misleading. The 'accessibility' information has been provided solely to assist with the planning of official SCRCA Project field-assessments and is intended as a general guide to allow each location to be assigned to an appropriate authorised assessor. If you decide to visit a structure associated with the SCRCA, you do so entirely at your own risk. You are requested and advised not to compromise your own safety or the safety of others; trespass; interfere with livestock, farm machinery, equipment, etc; or cause damage - especially to walls, fences, crops, etc. Please stick to Public Rights of Way or remain within other designated publicly accessible areas (e.g. C.R.O.W. land). Please also respect the privacy of the people who live and work in the area, including those who now live / work in what is, or once was, railway property. WARNING: The Settle Carlisle Railway is a modern (and very busy) railway owned by Network Rail. Trespassing on any non-public part of Network Rail land is dangerous and causes delays to the train service. It is also a criminal offence. More information on this subject can be found on the Network Rail website: to view the relevant page now, visit http://www.networkrail.co.uk/aspx/1037.aspx.


Appearance

This classification is only used for structures. Valid values (and their meanings) are as follows:

As-built: There is no evidence to suggest that the appearance of the structure has ever been significantly altered since it was originally constructed / installed. Any repairs / additions are of a minor nature and do not detract significantly from the original appearance of the structure.

Restored: It is known that the appearance of the structure was significantly altered at some point in the past, but it has subsequently been sensitively restored and the exterior now appears 'as-built' (or very close to it).

Modified: The external appearance of the structure has been significantly altered since original construction / installation, but the underlying structure has not been compromised and the modification 'history' can be easily 'read'.

Compromised: The structure's exterior has been altered so much that the original design / materials can no longer be appreciated. It is not possible to 'read' the modification 'history'.

Replaced: The original structure has been demolished / removed, but a more modern structure of the same type has been built / installed at (or close-to) the location in question.

Removed: The original structure has been demolished (or has collapsed) and no replacement (of the same type) has been built / installed at (or close-to) the location in question.

Unknown: The structure has not yet been assessed and / or the original (as-built) appearance of the structure has not yet been ascertained.


Assessment Report

The term 'Assessment Report' is an abbreviation of SCRCA Project Visual Assessment Report.

Assessment Reports are used to create a temporary record of information obtained during assessments of structures associated with the SCRCA Project.

Both paper and online (computerised) versions of the Assessment Report are available for SCRCA Team Members to use. The paper versions have been designed to facilitate the efficient recording of information in the field, whereas the online version facilitates the secure and efficient storage, review and analysis of that information on a long-term basis.

The use of the paper version is recommended for all assessments, although its use may be unnecessary if a good set of images are available. If a paper report is completed, it will normally be destroyed once the information has been uploaded to the database via the online version.

As the online Assessment Reports contain information that is potentially sensitive, they can only be accessed by signed-in authorised users (i.e. SCRCA Project Team Members plus other individuals / organisations directly involved in the management of the conservation area). Apart from the name of the assessor, no personal information is recorded during the structure assessment process. If you would like to see the kind of information that is being collected and recorded, a copy of the current paper version of the Assessment Report form can be downloaded via the link below:

SCRCA-Project_Visual-Assessment-Report_v1-2.pdf (v1.2 - pdf file, 65kb)

Structure Surveys vs. Structure Assessments: For the first two years of the SCRCA Project, the paper and online versions of this document were called Survey Reports. However, on February 10th 2014 the name of the recording forms were changed to Assessment Reports to avoid any misunderstanding as to the nature and extent of the structure assessment process. The structure assessments conducted as part of the SCRCA Project are quick visual assessments only. They are usually carried-out from a distance and some are carried-out without a site visit using only photographs and / or video-stills). These structure assessments are NOT detailed structural or archaeological surveys and they must not be used or interpreted as such. As part of the change, the words 'survey', 'surveyed' and 'surveyor' were replaced with the words 'assessment', 'assessed' and 'assessor' wherever possible.


Assessment Report Status

The Assessment Report status is used by control reviews and follow-up action. The valid categories are:
New: This is the default value and it is automatically used for all newly created Assessment Reports.
Open: The Assessment Report has been reviewed and follow-up action is currently underway.
Closed: The Assessment Report has been reviewed and all follow-up action (where required) has been completed or is being managed by means other than this status.


Brief description (of structure / site)

A short description of the structure or site. This should include an indication of the geographic location and structure or site 'type' (e.g. Blea Moor Signal Box, or Bridge SAC/66 - Ribblehead Viaduct).


Chains: See 'Location part 2 (chains)'.


Condition / Cond'n

This classification is only used for structures. The condition of each structure as assessed during an SCRCA Project Visual Details of tssessment. The 'condition' for standing structures (codes A to D) are not normally made available to the general public as it is potentially sensitive information. The full list of condition classifications is as follows:

A - Good: Appears (from a quick visual inspection) to be structurally sound, weather-tight and with no significant repairs needed. No follow-up action required. Allow the standard interval to pass before conducting the next assessment.

B - Fair: Appears (from a quick visual inspection) to be structurally sound, but in need of minor repairs or showing signs of a general lack of maintenance. No follow-up action required in the short-term, but it may be advisable to bring-forward the date of the next assessment.

C - Poor: There is clear visual evidence of deteriorating building materials (masonry, concrete, wood, metal, etc) and / or a leaking roof and / or defective water goods and / or there has been a fire or other disaster which has clearly affected part of the building. Consider options for follow-up action in the medium term. Consider bringing-forward the date of the next assessment.

D - Very Bad: There has been structural failure or there are clearly visible signs of structural instability; and / or building materials are in a state of dilapidation / rot; and / or there has been serious loss of significant areas of roof-covering leading to major deterioration of the interior; and / or there has been a major fire or other disaster affecting most of the building. Consider options for both short- and longer-term follow-up action. Consider bringing-forward the date of the next assessment.

E - Earthworks only: The structure has either collapsed or been wholly or substantially demolished, although its location can be identified by remaining earthworks and / or rubble and / or foundations. No follow-up action required once the remains have been recorded and photographed.

F - No trace: The structure has been demolished or removed completely - there is no trace of the building / structure above ground-level and no visible earthworks or foundations can be discerned that might indicate its location. No follow-up action required once the site has photographed.

X - Assessment not possible: The structure could not be assessed at the time of the visit as it (or its site) could not be seen (or could not be seen clearly enough) from the nearest publicly accessible location.
     
Z - Not assessed: No attempt has yet been made to assess the condition of the structure: its condition is not known.

NB: The structure assessments conducted as part of the SCRCA Historic Structure Recording Project are quick visual assessments only. They are usually carried-out from a distance and some are carried-out without a site visit using only photographs and / or video-stills). These structure assessments are NOT detailed structural or archaeological surveys and they must not be used or interpreted as such.


Condition Trend / Trend

The trend in the condition of the structure. Can only be assigned after two or more SCRCA Project Visual Assessments have been carried out.

I = Improving: there is a visible improvement in the condition of the structure since the previous visit(s).
D = Deteriorating: the condition of the structure has deteriorated since the previous visit(s) (this may be due to inadequate maintenance and / or inappropriate repairs / alterations, fire, vandalism, etc). Relevant details are to be included in the 'Additional notes / comments' section of the Assessment Report.
S = Stable: the structure shows no sign of either deterioration or improvement.
Z = Not assessed: the trend has not been assessed.

NB: The structure assessments conducted as part of the SCRCA Project are quick visual assessments only. They are usually carried-out from a distance and some are carried-out without a site visit using only photographs and / or video-stills). These structure assessments are NOT detailed structural or archaeological surveys and they must not be used or interpreted as such.


Construction / installation period / Period

The period during which the structure or site was constructed / installed / created - i.e.:

Pre-69 = Constructed / manufactured prior to 1869
MR-C = Midland Railway construction phase (1869 to 31st December 1876)
MR-O = Midland Railway operational phase (1st January 1877 to 31st December 1922)
LMSR = London Midland Scottish Railway operational phase (1st January 1923 to 31st December 1947)
BR = British Railways / British Rail operational phase (1st January 1948 to 31st March 1993)
Post-BR = After British Rail (includes Railtrack and Network Rail operational phases  (1st April 1994 to present)
Unknown = the date (and therefore the period) of construction / installation has not yet been ascertained


Current Use

How (for what purpose) is the structure or site currently being used?
Agricultural = used for animal grazing, crop-growing or other agricultural activities.
Commercial = used as an office, retail unit, manufacturing space, transport / warehousing depot or other non-railway and non-residential purpose.
Conserved = conserved for interpretation value but otherwise disused
Demolished = The structure has been wholly or substantially demolished / removed.
Disused = It is clear that the structure is not currently being used for any purpose.
Domestic = used for non-residential domestic purposes - e.g. domestic storage.
Museum = used as a museum / visitor centre
Railway ops = anything directly connected with operating or maintaining the railway. NB: All bridges and crossings are assigned 'Railway ops' as their primary purpose was / is to carry the railway over, across or under an obstruction, be it a watercourse, public right-of-way, or private right of access.
Relocated = The structure has been relocated (moved) to a new location. This classification is used for the original location. The structure in its new location will have its own Structure ID, Structure Record, etc.
Residential = use as a home or as holiday accommodation.
Unknown = The structure / site has either not yet been assessed; or its current use could not be determined at the time of the most recent assessment and it has not been determined since that assessment.


Default Image

The default image for an SCRCA Project structure or site is assigned as part of the review process before the relevant structure or site record is made publicly accessible. As a general rule, the default image will be the most attractive and most representative 'elevation' view available at the time of the review. The default image is reassessed as part of the ongoing review process and it will be updated if a more attractive / more representative image has been obtained since the previous review.


Detailed description of the structure

A comprehensive description of the structure's appearance (covering both design and materials) using standardised / approved Network Rail and English Heritage vocabulary. To encourage consistent descriptions, listed building inspectors have developed a standard order for entering description information and this should be followed in all cases. The acronym DAMP FISHES expresses the required order for presenting the information where:
D = Date (of construction);
A = Architect (name etc);
M = Materials;
P = Plan;
F = Facade;
I = Interiors (where appropriate);
S = Subsidiary features;
H = History (e.g. changes to its appearance / materials, NOT the history of its use);
E = Extras;
S = Sources.


Grid reference 1 (sheet letter version)

The twelve character (two 'sheet letters' and ten-digits) Ordnance Survey grid reference for the approximate centre of the structure - e.g. AB1234567890. If the grid-reference has been assessed manually using OS 1:25,000 mapping, trailing zeroes must be added at the end of the 3-digit or 4-digit northings and eastings in order to create the full twelve character ten-digit grid-reference.


Grid Reference 2 (all numeric version)

The twelve digit (i.e. all numeric) version of the Ordnance Survey grid reference for the approximate centre of the structure - e.g. AB1234567890. If the grid-reference has been assessed manually using OS 1:25,000 mapping, trailing zeroes must be added at the end of the 3-digit or 4-digit northings and eastings in order to create the full twelve-digit grid-reference.


Grid-Ref Method / GR-Method

How was the grid-reference calculated? The codes used - and their meanings - are as follows:

25k-Map = it was estimated on-site using an OS 1:25,000 map;
GPS-Con = it was calculated on-site using consumer grade GPS equipment;
GPS-Pro  = it was calculated on-site using professional surveying grade GPS equipment;
Image     = it was estimated from a photograph or video-still using an OS 1:25,000 map;
Landplan = it was estimated by geo-referencing the 1911 land-plans;
Not-Est   = a grid-reference has not yet been estimated / calculated.


Image types

Context = Photographs or stills from video or cine-film (excluding cab-view footage) that show the structure 'in context' - i.e. images that show how the structure (or structure cluster) fits-in to the wider landscape and for images that show how the structure relates to other nearby structures within a structure cluster. (All images of sites are, by definition, 'context' images.)

Detail = Photographs or stills from video or cine-film (excluding cab-view footage) that show specific details of the structure - i.e. close-up photographs of notable architectural / decorative features (e.g. doors & windows, mouldings / carvings, datestones, roof finials, chimney pots, etc) and any areas of poor, deteriorating or improved condition (e.g. rot, structural damage, recent repairs, etc.)

Elevation = Photographs or stills from video or cine-film (excluding cab-view footage) that show the various 'elevations' (i.e. side-on views) of the structure.

Cab-view = Photographs taken from inside the cab of a train or stills from cab-view (driver's eye view) style video or cine-film footage.


Interpretation Material 1 & 2

Is any interpretation material relating to this structure available? Valid answers for the 'Interpretation Material 1' field are:

Y = Yes;
N = No; or
Z = not known.

If interpretation material is available, a summary of the information available and the format(s) in which it is available (e.g. on-site interpretation panel; free handout; booklet / leaflet available for purchase from the FoSCL shop; etc) is to be provided in the 'Interpretation Material 2' field.


Latest assessment date

If the structure has been assessed as part of the SCRCA Project, this field will contain the date of the most recent assessment (e.g. 07 Aug 2012). If the structure has not yet been assessed, this field will be empty (blank).


List Entry Number (LEN or L.E.N.)

All Listed Buildings are assigned a unique reference number - known as a 'List Entry Number' - by English Heritage. If there is a reference in this field, it can be used to view the relevant entry in "The National Heritage List for England" via the English Heritage website at: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/professional/protection/process/national-heritage-list-for-england/


Local Authority's Reference

The relevant Local Authority's unique reference for the structure in question (where known).


Location part 1 (rail-miles)

The distance of the structure or site in rail-miles (via the former Midland Railway's most direct route) from London St Pancras, rounding-down to the nearest whole mile. The value entered must lie between 231 and 308. (Note: One mile = 5,280 feet / 1,760 yards = approximately 1,609 metres.)


Location part 2 (chains)

The approximate distance of the structure or site from the previous full milepost in chains. (Note: There are 80 chains in one statute mile: one chain = 4 rods = 22 yards = 66 feet = 100 links.)


Location part 3 (Position / Pos'n)

The location or position of the structure or site relative to the main running lines (rail-tracks):

Up = on the 'up' side (i.e. the side nearest to the south-bound track used by south-bound trains heading towards Hellifield and beyond).
Down = on the 'down' side (i.e. the side nearest to the north-bound track used by north-bound trains heading towards Carlisle and beyond).
Middle = in-between the 'up' and 'down' lines.
Below = beneath the tracks (applies mainly to bridges & culverts).
Above = over the top of the tracks (applies mainly to bridges & tunnels).
Level-X = across the tracks on the level (level crossings only).
Remote = well-beyond (outside) the normal railway boundary line, regardless of side.


Method of assessment

How was the assessment conducted?
On-site = Assessed while on-site - i.e. within view of the structure.
Off-site_HQ = Assessed off-site using high-quality images that show fine-detail.
Off-site_LQ = Assessed off-site using low-quality images that do not show fine-detail. (Note: stills from cab-view video footage will always fall into this category unless filmed and supplied in full HD with minimal motion blur or other clarity issues).

NB: The structure assessments conducted as part of the SCRCA Historic Structure Recording Project are quick visual assessments only. They are usually carried-out from a distance and some are carried-out without a site visit using only photographs and / or video-stills). These structure assessments are NOT detailed structural or archaeological surveys and they must not be used or interpreted as such.


Miles: See 'Location 1 (miles)'.


Network Rail's Reference

Network Rail's unique reference for the structure in question (where known).


Notes from primary sources

Cross-reference and summary information for, plus (where copyright rules allow) quoted extracts and / or attachments containing digitised copies of, any information, photographs, diagrams, etc relating to the structure or site contained in primary sources. Primary sources include current and historic maps, land-plans, distance diagrams, construction drawings, engineer’s drawings / structural plans, Historic Monument Records, county, parish & census records, archaeological survey reports, photographs, film / video footage, news reports, oral histories (existing & new), artefacts in museums & private collection, etc.


Notes from secondary sources

Cross-reference and summary information for any notes, photographs, diagrams, etc relating to the structure or site contained in published sources such as books & magazines.


Protection Category

In addition to their location within a designated conservation area, some of the structures and sites within the SCRCA benefit from the additional protection conferred by one or more of the following categories of official protection assigned by English Heritage:

SAM-I = Scheduled Ancient Monument and Grade I listed: The structure is located within "an archaeological site considered by the government to be of national importance" and it is  "a building or structure of exceptional interest - perhaps even internationally important" - i.e. it is also grade I listed.

SAM-II* = Scheduled Ancient Monument and Grade II* listed: The structure is located within "an archaeological site considered by the government to be of national importance" and it is  "a building or structure that is nationally important and of special interest" - i.e. it is also grade II* listed.

SAM-II = Scheduled Ancient Monument and Grade II listed: The structure is located within "an archaeological site considered by the government to be of national importance" and it is  "a building or structure that is nationally important and of special interest" - i.e. it is also grade II listed.

SAM-Loc = Scheduled Ancient Monument and Locally Listed: The structure is located within  "an archaeological site considered by the government to be of national importance"  and it is "a building or structure considered worthy of protection at a local level" - i.e. it has also been included on the 'Local List'.

SAM = Scheduled Ancient Monument: The site is - or the structure is located within - "an archaeological site considered by the government to be of national importance". but it is NOT listed (locally or nationally.

Gr-I = Listed, Grade I: A building or structure of exceptional interest - perhaps even internationally important.

Gr-II* = Listed, Grade II*: A particularly important building or structure, i.e., of more than special interest.

Gr-II = Listed, Grade II: A building or structure that is nationally important and of special interest.

L-Local = Listed locally: A building or structure considered worthy of protection at a local level.

CA-Only = Conservation Area location only: The only protection for this structure is its location within a designated Conservation Area.

NA-Dem = Not Applicable, Demolished: Structure-level protection (i.e. listing) is not applicable as the structure has been wholly or partially demolished and the site of the structure does not lie within the boundaries of a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

None = The structure or site is not currently protected: It lies outside the current boundary of the SCRCA and it does not benefit from any other form of protection.

Unknown = The Structure Protection Category is not known: The Protection Category for the structure or site has not yet been ascertained.

Where a structure or site does benefit from some form of additional protection, the relevant details should be recorded in the 'Protection Details' field and / or a link should be provided to the relevant entry in "The National Heritage List for England" via the English Heritage website at: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/professional/protection/process/national-heritage-list-for-england/.


SCRCA

SCRCA is the standard abbreviation used throughout this website for the Settle - Carlisle Railway Conservation Area (SCRCA). The SCRCA is a 78-mile section of railway that is considered to be an area of special architectural and historical interest. In a bid to preserve the character and appearance of this unique section of railway, it was officially designated a Conservation Area in 1991. It is the longest conservation area in the United Kingdom and it covers the entire railway (and all asssociated historic structures) between Hellifield Junction (two miles south of Settle) and Carlisle Citadel station.

See also SCRCA Project below.


SCRCA ID

Every relevant structure and site within the SCRCA has been or will be assigned a unique "SCRCA ID" - i.e. a six-digit code comprised of the 'rail-mileage' (a three-digit whole number between 231 and 308) followed by three additional digits (000 to 999) that reflect the relative position of the structure / site within the mile.

For example, the 236½ mile-post will be allocated an SCRCA ID of 236500, while a structure located a few metres to the north of it would be allocated an SCRCA ID of 236510.

To allow new structures and sites to be inserted in the future, the "an SCRCA IDs” were initially allocated in steps of ten or more - e.g. 236500, 236510, 236560, 236570, etc.

Please note that the relative order and sub-mile distance implied by the final three digits is only approximate, particularly in areas containing a large number of tightly grouped structures and / or in locations where the railway boundary broadens-out (e.g. station yards).


SCRCA Project

At the beginning of 2012, a very small group of volunteers launched a long-term project to identify, catalogue and (gradually) research the history of key railway-related structures and sites within the Settle - Carlisle Railway Conservation Area (see SCRCA above).

A short introduction to the project is available on the SCRCA Project Homepage.


SCRCA Snippet

An 'SCRCA Snippet' is a piece of background information relating to a structure or site within or otherwise associated with the SCRCA. SCRCA Snippets are shown - grouped by 'Snippet Type' - in the relevant Structure Summary.


Side: See 'Location part 3 (side)'.


Site Record

Each SCRCA site has a unique Site Record in the computerised database. The Site Record is used to store the basic details of the site, including its SCRCA ID, type, location, and description. The information stored in the Site Records forms the key part of (and is normally viewed via) the Location Summaries.


Structure I.D. (Str.ID)

See SCRCA ID.


Structure List

SCRCA Structure Lists were the original means of displaying and accessing information relating to SCRCA structures. However, in most cases, they have been replaced with more user-friendly views over the SCRCA Project Database - see the SCRCA Project Homepage for details.


Structure Record

Each SCRCA structure has a unique Structure Record in the computerised database. The Structure Record is used to store the basic details of the structure, including its SCRCA ID, type, location, and description. The information stored in the Structure Records forms the key part of (and is normally viewed via) the Location Summaries.


Structure Summary

An "SCRCA Location Summary" (previously known as a 'Structure Summary') is a consolidated view of all currently available information relating to a single SCRCA location (structure or site). It includes key information from the base Structure Record or Site Record plus any available images (photographs and / or video-stills) and Structure Snippets.

For signed-in authorised users (i.e. SCRCA Project Team Members and SCRCA Guests), each Location Summary will also include a summary of (and a link to) any relevant Assessment Reports.


Structure / Site Type

Each structure and site associated with the SCRCA Project has been classified by 'type' (usually reflecting its primary function / purpose). A full list of these types (with associated definitions) is available on the SCRCA structure / site 'types' with associated definitions page.

Some of the Structure /Site Types have been further classified into sub-types or 'variants' - see 'Variants' below.


Structure / Site Type Variant: See 'Variant'.


Survey Report

See Assessment Report.


Trend: See 'Condition Trend'.


Type: See 'Structure / Site Type'.


Variant (a.k.a. Structure / Site Type Variant): Some structure / site 'types' are further classified into smaller groups with a similar key characteristic such as a common design, method of construction and / or primary use. A full list of these 'variants' (with associated definitions) is available on the SCRCA structure / site 'variants' with associated definitions page.


Visibility

How visible is the structure or site from the nearest public right of way or other publicly accessible location?

Visible: All or most of the structure / site is visible from a public right-of-way, CROW 'Access land', or other land to which the public has a right of access.

Part-visible: Only part of the structure / site can be seen from a publicly accessible area.

Not visible: There is no public access to a vantage point from where the structure / site (or the vast majority of it) can be viewed / assessed. The structure can only be viewed / assessed by obtaining prior permission from the relevant land-owner(s), although it may be possible to obtain a quick glimpse of the structure from a passing train.

Unknown: The visibility of the structure / site has not yet been assessed.


Visual Assessment Report

See Assessment Report.


Last updated by Mark Harvey on 23/03/2017
The SCRCA Project section of the FoSCL website was designed and
developed by Mark R. Harvey. Database rights have been asserted.